Information
  • Lead-organizer: Sweden
  • 19:30 - 21:00
  • Date: 13 Jun 2012
  • Room: P3-1

Forests in a global bioeconomy requires wise governance and management

Organizing partners

Organized by: Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Organizing partner: Swedish Forestry Agency.

Introduction

Forests provide services for society and forests are fundamental life-support systems in the biosphere. Forests are pivotal in facing the challenge of climate change. Renewable energy and products from forests can substitute for currently used fossil alternatives in order to mitigate climate change. Simultaneously the delivery of other forest ecosystem services needs to be sustained. The Swedish model for sustainable forestry acknowledges the importance of private and public ownership, policy, and democracy for achieving sound forest governance. Sweden is a leading forestry country: with less than 1% of the forested area in the world, Sweden accounts for 5% of the harvest globally, and 10% of the global trade in forest products.

Detailed programme

In Sweden modern forest governance was initiated in the early 1900s. Overexploited forests have since then been turned into forests delivering high biomass yields while at the same time ensuring other ecosystem services. This side-event will communicate the fundaments of the Swedish model for sustainable forestry. We will provide an outlook of how sound forest management on a global scale can mitigate climate change and contribute to a knowledge based bioeconomy.
Specifically the side-event will focus on three major issues:
? Sustainable forest management.We will describe the Swedish model for sustainable forestry. The importance of private and public ownership, policy, and democracy for achieving good governance is stressed. The Swedish Forestry Act equals forest?s production and environmental values. The Right of Commons ensures public access to all forest land. High ambitions regarding a wide array of ecosystem services to satisfy public demands have been combined with silvicultural practices doubling the volume of growing stock as well as sustainable levels of logging. We discuss how the Swedish model for sustainable forestry can serve as a guide for developing forestry globally.

? Climate change mitigation. We highlight the importance of system boundaries to understand climatic impacts of forestry. Why is deforestation a problem with regard to the carbon balance in the tropics, whereas logging is a condition for upholding both high carbon stores and a high growth rate in the Swedish forests? What is the difference between the forest being a carbon store and a deliverer of renewable material? What are the consequences of different strategies for using the forests on different time scales?

? The knowledge based bioeconomy. We discuss the potential for efficient forestry to contribute to a global green economy with sustainable and CO2 neutral consumption of renewable materials. What if a major part of the world?s boreal forests were to be managed according to the Swedish model for sustainable forestry?

Speakers to be invited include:
Vice-chancellor Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Lisa Sennerby-Forsse
Professor Tomas Lundmark, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Professor Annika Nordin, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
Peter Blombäck, Head Policy and Analysis Division, Swedish Forestry Agency
Professor Carlos Alberto Labate, University of Sao Paulo School of Agriculture (ESALQ-USP), Brazil
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