For Media

Hotels for Press
Accommodation levels in Rio de Janeiro are anticipated to be at full occupancy during the conference. While it is not the responsibility of the United Nations to procure accommodation for the media, it should be noted that the Brazilian national organizing committee for Rio+20 has committed to blocking a minimum of 500 hotel rooms in Rio de Janeiro for media covering the conference. Costs must be covered by the media. For more details, visit: http://www.rio20.gov.br For information regarding room availability please contact: Terramar Travel Agency

Emails: reservas2@terramar.tur.br or reservas4@terramar.tur.br or reservas8@terramar.tur.br

Tel: (+55+21) 35120067 or (+55+11) 30142042 or (+55+19) 35145600

Media representatives must present their approval letter and copy rio20.hoteis@itamaraty.gov.br when requesting their accommodations.

Information

UN chief stresses need to ?connect the dots? on sustainable development
Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon today wrapped up a four-nation visit to the South Pacific with a call for countries to ?connect the dots? between issues such as climate change, food insecurity and water scarcity and work towards ensuring sustainable development for all.

?The sustainable development agenda is the agenda for the 21st century,? Mr. Ban told an audience at the University of Sydney in Australia, the last stop on a week-long trip that also took the United Nations chief to the Solomon Islands, Kiribati and New Zealand.

He noted that, while on the surface, these might seem like distinct issues, they are actually linked and it is necessary to find those linkages.

Climate change is one of the greatest threats to the security, well-being and livelihoods of the peoples of the region. Mr. Ban got a first-hand look at the impact of rising sea levels on a visit to the low-lying island nation of Kiribati, where he also joined young people in planting mangroves on a beach to help fight coastal erosion.

The Secretary-General told the gathering in Sydney that scores of countries are heading down a lower-carbon path because they know it is good for their economies and good for the health and well-being of their people. He cited, among others, the Sustainable Sydney initiative to reduce carbon emissions in the city by 70 per cent over the next 20 years.
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